Moments of Incredible Brutality: MysteryPeople Q&A with David Joy

  • Interview by Crime Fiction Coordinator Scott Montgomery

David Joy caught our attention with his brutal and poignant debut, Where All Light Tends to Go, hailed as a modern classic in the growing genre of rural noir. His next book, The Weight of the World, is our MysteryPeople Pick of the Month, and comes out today! David Joy was kind enough to answer a few questions about his latest book and his philosophy of writing. 

MysteryPeople Scott: The Weight Of This World deals with three characters on the bottom rungs of society who’ve made some bad life choices, but you never feel like your look at people in a white trash zoo, you have an understanding of them. Can you talk about how you approached Thad, Aiden and April?

David Joy: I remember one time hearing George Saunders say, “Fiction is empathy’s training wheels.” That idea has always stuck with me. I think the most important job I have is to show the humanity of every character I write. When you’re telling the kinds of stories I tell about the types of people I’m writing about, you carry a tremendous obligation to get to that humanity, and that’s not an easy thing to do. We’re talking about drug addicts and thieves, people capable of committing horrifying acts of violence. We live in a world where we’re able to put a great deal of distance between “us” and “them” for the sake of comfortably. We live in a word where it’s easy to demonize those people, to say to ourselves, “I’m nothing like them.” The problem with that is it leaves little room for dislodge, and without conversation you can never address a problem. I was reading a review recently and a woman said, almost angrily, “He made me care about these people!” That’s about the highest compliment I could ever hope for. I made them care. The reality is, as much as I wish it weren’t true, that’s a very hard thing to do.

Read More »

Advertisements

MysteryPeople Pick of the Month: THE INNOCENTS by Ace Atkins

9780399173950– Post by Crime Fiction Coordinator Scott Montgomery

Ace Atkins’ latest Quinn Colson novel, The Innocents, burns with anger even as it delivers the fun dialogue and bad ass action you expect. At first, I thought the title was ironic, since just about every character is guilty of something. Atkins has focused on an issue of Southern culture, race, religion, politics, in each book. Here he covers everything and has a bone to pick with all topics included, even football.

The book picks up roughly a year after Quinn being kicked out as sheriff in The Redeemers. He returns home from training Afghani security forces policing techniques. He takes a new job as deputy under the new sheriff, his friend, Lillie Virgil.

Read More »

MysteryPeople Pick of the Month: THE FAR EMPTY by J Todd Scott

  • Review by Crime Fiction Coordinator Scott Montgomery

9780399176340The Southwest has become a popular backdrop for crime fiction of late. It operates in both the parallel worlds of modern drug trafficking and historic legend of the old west. Authors utilize a brutal landscape and its history in combination with the brutality of humanity. J Todd Scott, a former DEA agent who worked in that area, uses it to full effect in his debut novel, The Far Empty.

Each chapter follows the point of view of one of the citizens of of the fictional Murfee, Texas or one of their neighbors on the other side of the border. The first one is if Caleb Ross, an awkward teenager and the only person whose side gets told in first person. He discusses his life and the disappearance of his mother. Caleb believes it was murder and knows who the killer is, his father Stanford “Judge” Ross, Murfee’s mythic sheriff.

New deputy Chris Cherry, a young man who returns home after his football career and marriage have been waylaid by an injury, discovers a decomposed, flex-cuffed body. Caleb is convinced it is his mother. Soon, they are in a deadly dance with the judge, pulling a school teacher, drug runners, and others into their tempest of violence.

Scott’s Murfee appears to be a stand in for Marfa, Texas, a town that shares some of its sordid history and mysterious light formations. He uses the state’s legends, history, and its legacy of bloodshed. He examines violence by what parks it and creates a circle of it, avoiding literary distance by tying violence to his characters and making it utterly human.

The Far Empty is is a look at a land and how its history shapes those who live on it today. It’s a place where even the innocent become corrupted. The big land is empty of many things, especially mercy.

The Far Empty comes out Tuesday, June 7th. Pre-order now! J Todd Scott, joined by C J Howell, will be speaking and signing his debut on Friday, June 10th, beginning at 7 PM. All BookPeople events are free and open to the public. 

MysteryPeople Pick of the Month: SUNSET CITY by Melissa Ginsburg

Melissa Ginsburg joins us here at BookPeople on Saturday, April 30th, at 3 PM, to speak and sign her debut Houston-set noir, Sunset City. You can find copies of Sunset City on our shelves or via bookpeople.com starting April 12th, or pre-order now! All BookPeople events are free and open to the public. 

  • Review by Molly Odintz

9780062429704At the start of Sunset CityCharlotte Ford, Houston barista and general slacker, gets a call to have drinks with an old friend, Danielle Reeves. She also gets a pleading visit from Danielle’s mother, desperate to speak with her daughter about a lucrative real estate deal. When Danielle turns up murdered, Charlotte is at the top of the list to be interviewed by the police. While the cops quickly dismiss her as a suspect, Charlotte conducts her own investigation, her loyalty to her childhood friend trumping any sense of personal danger.

With only a debut under her belt, Ginsburg is already establishing herself as a superb feminist crime writer. Sunset City begins, like many a detective novel, with a dead sex worker. Unlike in much of the genre, however, she has a name – Danielle. She is not a hooker, but an adult film star; she is not an excuse for a plot, but the source of the plot itself; she is defined, not by sexual relationships, but through her strong friendships with other women.

Read More »

MysteryPeople Pick of the Month: HONKY TONK SAMURAI by Joe R. Lansdale

 

9780316329408

  • Review by Crime Fiction Coordinator Scott Montgomery

When Joe Lansdale writes a Hap and Leonard novel, you know you’re in for a good time. The misadventures of the red neck liberal and his gay black Republican partner-in-crime supply a lot of laughs and action. With Honky Tonk Samurai, the boys are back and joined by all their rowdy friends.

By now in the series, Hap and Leonard are officially private eyes. Hap’s girlfriend, Brett, has bought the agency from their friend, Marvin Hanson, who is now chief of police. Their first case is for a salty old woman who wants to find her granddaughter. The clues quickly lead to a used car/prostitution/extortion ring. when the bad guys call on an inbred family of psycho-assassins to do their dirty work, the boys put out the call, rounding up their friends like good ol’ boy PI Jim Bob Luke, reporter Cason, the beautiful and highly skilled hitwoman Vanilla Ride, and Cason’s sociopath friend Booger, like the magnificent seven with fewer and weirder members.

For the fans of the series, it is like getting together with an old friend, especially the one that just got out of prison.

Read More »

MysteryPeople Pick of the Month: WOMAN WITH A BLUE PENCIL by Gordon McAlpine

  • Post by Molly

woman with a blue pencil

In college, I developed an obsession with the film El Otro Francisco, a multi-layered Marxist retelling of a romantic abolitionist novel, and have looked for years for something as satisfying in its combination of story and critique. I’ve finally found that in our November Pick of the Month – Gordon McAlpine’s latest novel, Woman with a Blue Pencil, out from Seventh Street Books on November 10.  

In the film El Otro Francisco, more easily found in academic articles than on a dvd, three narratives are presented. The first, based on the abolitionist novel Francisco (Cuba’s Uncle Tom’s Cabin), tells the story of two slaves, Francisco and his lady love, both in relatively privileged roles on their plantation. The plantation owner’s son falls in love with Francisco’s lover, leading to tragedy for all. The second narrative reinterprets the first with a Marxist lens – enslaved characters pursue freedom, not romance, and the plantation owner’s son is not motivated by lust, but by greed. A third narrative depicts Francisco‘s author, Anselmo Suárez y Romero, distorting the reality of slavery in order to gain a sympathetic elite audience.

The film uses dialectical materialism – the thesis of the first narrative, the antithesis of the second, and the synthesis of the the third – to retell the novel’s story for a modern audience. Read more about this filmLike El Otro Francisco, the novel is divided into three interwoven parts: a series of letters from an editor in New York to a young Japanese author, interned during WWII; a jingoistic spy novel that follows a Korean detective on the search for Japanese fifth columnists; and a second, sub-novel, following two characters cut out of the interned author’s initial draft, trying to figure out why they no longer exist.

Read More »

MysteryPeople Pick of the Month: THOSE WE LEFT BEHIND by Stuart Neville

Stuart Neville joins Jesse Sublett, Mike McCrary, and Gabino Iglesias for our upcoming Noir at the Bar. Come by the Penn Field Opal Divine’s this October 6th at 7 PM for books, booze, and readings from each author, plus some murder ballads from writer-musician Jesse Sublett. Those We Left Behind, Stuart’s latest novel, is our October Pick of the Month here at MysteryPeople. 

  • Post by Molly

those we left behindStuart Neville is one of the major voices in Northern Ireland’s new wave of crime fiction, dubbed “Ulster Noir” by the Guardian.  The whole of Ireland has become a power-house in crime writing over the past few decades, producing some of the best in international crime fiction from such voices as Ken Bruen, Lee Child, Tana French, and Adrian McKinty, and earning a reputation for Scandinavian-style dark, atmospheric tales. Neville’s latest novel, Those We Left Behind, is our October MysteryPeople Pick of the Month. Neville joins us for our bi-monthly celebration of books and booze, Noir at the Bar, this upcoming October 6th.

Stuart Neville’s many novels have run the gamut in subject matter. The Ghosts Of Belfast and Collusion are steeped in the legacy of sectarian violence and use mystery conventions as an approach to truth and reconciliation. Ratlines explores the lingering effects of Ireland’s semi-neutrality during WWII, while The Final Silence uses a mystery trope – a serial killer in the family – to explore how sectarianism opened the way for casual violence and perpetuated a culture of secrets. The Northern Ireland of The Final Silence, more-so than his previous novels, is one influenced by the past, but as much concerned about contemporary, general European issues as with problems specific to Northern Ireland.

Read More »