Scott’s Top Ten of 2015

  • Post by Crime Fiction Coordinator Scott Montgomery

If there was a common thread through the best books of 2015, it was ambition. Authors stretched themselves by taking on large subjects or writing something much different, or taking their series characters down a different path. All of these authors raised the bar for themselves and leaped over it.


hollow man1. Hollow Man by Mark Pryor

Pryor’s smart use of point of view puts us in the head of Dominic – Austin prosecutor, musician, and sociopath – who gets involved with a robbery and to continue to tap into his darker nature when things go bad. One of the freshest and best neo-noirs to come down the pike.


the cartel2. The Cartel by Don Winslow

Winslow’s sequel to The Power Of The Dog reignites the blood feud between DEA agent Art Keller and cartel head Adán Barrera in epic fashion to show the disastrous effect of the war on drugs in Mexico. A book that both enrages and entertains.Read More »

MysteryPeople Q&A with Jason Starr

Jason Starr is one of the leading names in modern noir. His latest, Savage Lane, deals with how the projections of several people in a community lead to murder, working both as a involving thriller and satire on suburbia. Jason was kind enough to take a few questions about the book and writing on the edge.

MysteryPeople Scott: What spurred the idea for Savage Lane?

Jason Starr: The idea of a recently divorced woman, trying to get on with her life in a small, insular community. The suburbs can be a fish bowl, what with everybody getting into your business, making assumptions, and when you’re divorced in a community of mostly married people you become the subject of gossip, and perhaps unwanted fantasies. Then I though more about who this woman is, and about a friendship she has with an unhappily married man, and I knew this situation would provide plenty of fodder for a crime thriller.

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Three Picks for October

ville ratThe Ville Rat by Martin Limón

The latest book to feature Sueño and Bascom, two Army CID detectives in 1970s Korea, has the detectives assigned two cases that put them up against one of the toughest and tightest units stationed on the North-South border. Limón uses an involving mystery to look at race and politics in the military for one of his best. The Ville Rat comes out Tuesday, October 6. You can find copies on our shelves after tomorrow, or order at any time via bookpeople.com.

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