Three Picks for March

Run Away Cover ImageRun Away by Harlan Coben: A few months ago, Simon Greene and his wife Ingrid made the difficult decision not to go after their drug addicted daughter Paige when she ran away to her abusive boyfriend Aaron. One morning Simon sees Paige in Central Park, a shadow of her former self, playing guitar for tips, but when he tries to talk to her Aaron intervenes. Countless cell phone cameras are there to record their encounter, and the resulting video of a privileged white man who tries to accost a young woman and then beats the homeless man who comes to her aid quickly goes viral. A few months later Aaron is dead and Paige is missing, and Simon is drawn into the dark underbelly of the New York drug scene to try to find her. You just can’t turn the pages fast enough. – Meike

 

A Friend Is a Gift You Give Yourself Cover ImageA Friend Is A Gift You Give Yourself by William Boyle: The incredibly funny yet tough novel follows a mob widow and retired porn star thrown together through fate involving family dysfunction, bad men, and stolen mafia cash. Boyle works the humor toward the characters instead of the other way around and never lets it mute the danger these ladies are in or the people they are. Instead it serves as a way to explore female friendship. Major actresses over forty should be fighting over the film rights. – Scott

 

 

 

The American Agent: A Maisie Dobbs Novel Cover ImageThe American Agent by Jacqueline Winspear: When a young American correspondent named Catherine Saxon is found murdered in her London apartment, Maisie is called in to investigate her death. She’s asked to work with Mark Scott, an American agent from the US Department of Justice–and the man who helped Maisie get out of Hitler’s Munich in 1938. While the blitzkrieg rains terror and destruction on London, Maisie is torn between the need to find Catherine’s killer and the need to love and protect her young ward Anna–and the pull of her feelings for the American agent. – Meike

Stranger Danger: Scott Butki Reviews Harlan Coben’s THE STRANGER

the stranger harlan coben

Post by Scott Butki

You know that famous saying that there are a limited number of plots? Well, with his latest book, Harlan Coben, has just added one more to the list. We’ve all read books, especially thrillers, where a friend or family loved one turns into an enemy and you fight for your life. See Gone Girl, etc, for that plot-line.

Or those books where protagonists are fighting their enemy, adversary, nemesis; be it Sherlock versus Moriarty, Americans fighting Russian leaders in the 80s, or, more recently, those same Americans fighting Middle Eastern terrorists. In both cases plot-lines often involve plot twists which regularly involve secrets.

Coben, in his new book, The Stranger, explores another concept: What if strangers approached you and, without any obvious motivation, told you something about your daughter and/or wife that just destroys you and,potentially, your family? As the book kicks off, the protagonist, Adam Price, is approached by a stranger who tells him that his wife used a website to fake a pregnancy. When he asks her about it she essentially disappears. Meanwhile, a mother is told a completely different secret about her daughter that is similarly shocking and destructive to their family.

Who are these strangers and why are they sharing these secrets? Not since viewing Alfred Hitchcock’s classic noir Strangers On A Train, based on the Patricia Highsmith book of the same name, have I been so wary of strangers. Stranger Danger indeed! I don’t want to say more for fear of giving up spoilers.

I am embarrassed to admit, given that I read about 50 books a year and do at least 15 interviews of authors a year (indexed here), that The Stranger is the first Harlan Coben book I have read. Given how strong and engaging I found the plot-line to be, I will soon be reading more by him.


Harlan Coben comes to BookPeople Thursday, March 26, at 7 PM on BookPeople’s second floor. Mr. Coben will be speaking and signing his latest oh-so-chilling thriller,The Stranger. All BookPeople events are free and open to the public. You must purchase a copy of the book in order to join the signing line. Copies of The Stranger are available on our shelves and via bookpeople.com.

If you like Harlan Coben…

Harlan Coben’s popularity is no surprise. His standalone thrillers have “what if” plots that Hitchcock would have killed for and his series featuring Myron Bolitar has some of the best buddy banter in mysteries today between the hero and his wealthy and lethal sidekick Win. If you’re shopping for a Coben fan, who has devoured all his books, here are some suggestions for a perfect gift.


 

One Minute Gone1. One Minute Gone by Davis Hansard

Single father Porter hall gets three calls in succession – two about his soon-to be ex wife and one about a lunch date with his girlfriend. When the girlfriend misses the lunch date and goes missing all together, Porter’s search links the three calls to some serious movers and shakers using him as a sacrificial pawn. Moving in both pace and emotion with an everyman hero you can’t help but root for.

the bookseller2. The Bookseller by Mark Pryor

if you like the buddy antics of Bolitar and Win, then you’ll dig the relationship  of square-jawed hero Hugo Marston, Chief Of Security for our embassy in Paris, and his hard drinking, skirt chasing, CIA pal Tom Green who has no verbal filter whatsoever. The two are out of their jurisdiction as they try to find a kidnapped bookseller, thrust into a plot involving drug cartels and France’s past sins. Some of the best banter around.

ben rehder gone the next3.Gone The Next by Ben Rehder

A meeting of the two best parts of Coben. Legal videographer Roy Ballard catches a glimpse of who he thinks might be a recently missing girl. The fact that he lost his own daughter to an abduction doesn’t make him a believable witness to the Austin PD. Obsessed with finding the girl and possibly easing his own guilt, he uses his own skill set and finds help from his partner, sexy smart-ass Mia. Their relationship keeps the story humorous, while the plotting keeps it harrowing.


Copies of the above listed books can be found on our shelves and via bookpeople.com.