MysteryPeople Makes the List!

Mystery transparent_1000pxMysteryPeople has recently been featured on Feedspot’s list of the Top 50 Mystery Blogs around today, and we couldn’t be more proud to share list space with sites like The Strand Mystery Magazine, Mystery Writers of America, Killer Characters, ReviewingtheEvidence.com, and the Seattle Mystery Bookstore. We’re ranked number 17 on the list – plus we’re the highest ranked bookstore blog!

We’ve also got plenty of strange bedfellows on the list, given the multiple meanings of “mystery,” so those looking for blogs featuring paranormal mysteries, ancient aliens, Reddit discussions of unsolved crimes, and more, take a look at this fascinating list (which does primarily feature mystery fiction review sites).

Thanks to Feedspot, the authors who inspire us, and our loyal readers for helping us make our mark in the blog scene!

See the full Feedspot list. 

Scott’s Top Ten of 2017 (So Far)

  • Post by Crime Fiction Coordinator Scott Montgomery

Around this time of the year, we like to look back on what has come out so far in the year as we think of suggestions for reading for the rest of the summer. Below, you’ll find recommended reads that deserve their due. In fact some are so good I had to combine a few, so my top ten is a top twelve.

97800626644191. The Force by Don Winslow

I know, an obvious choice, but it is so obviously great. This epic look at today’s New York through police eyes has plot, character, and theme singing together in this opera of city corruption. You can find copies of The Force on our shelves and via bookpeople.com

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Molly’s Top Ten International Crime Fiction of 2017 (so far)

  • Post by Director of Suspense Molly Odintz

After this 4th of July, I find myself thinking of other places, far from here – and the fantastic crime novels set there. Below, you’ll find a list of recommended summer reads for the international crime fiction enthusiast. This year, I’ve had a historical theme to my reading, although most of the works listed below are in communication with our modern sensibilities as much as they represent a window into the past. Not much else unifies the selections below, and perhaps that’s part of why I love international crime fiction; it celebrates the diversity of world experience in a way impossible to find in a single nation’s literature. All are great crime novels, and each one should make for perfect summer reading for the armchair traveler. 

1. The Long Drop by Denise Mina9780316380577

Denise Mina’s first historical novel is a better than the words I know to describe it – almost impossibly good. Mina bases her latest on the trial of Peter Manuel, a serial killer in midcentury Glasgow, and splits her narrative between the lurid details of the trial and the pub crawl from hell as Peter Manuel and William Watt, the surviving patriarch of a murdered family, go from bar to bar, sinking deeper into the Glasgow underworld and getting closer to admiting their most private truths to one another. The more we get to know Watt and Manuel, the more sinister the trial of Peter Manuel becomes, heightened in tension by the dramatic irony of what we know and what the jury suspects, but can’t quite allow themselves to contemplate…A knowing, mature and sympathetic portrait of a society defined by violence and proud of it, that we may now judge and find wanting. You can find copies of The Long Drop on our shelves and via bookpeople.com. 

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Recommended Reads from Raul, Part One

There’s plenty of mystery readers here at BookPeople, and Raul Chapa, our First Floor Inventory Manager, is one of the most prolific. Below, Raul reviews a few mysteries he’s been enjoying lately, some of which we’ve already gushed about on the blog, and some of which we’ve barely mentioned – until now.

9780399174551The Forgotten Girls by Owen Laukkanen

Along the most northern border of America, the High Line railway crosses some of the most wintry landscapes and is deadly on its own; however, a ghost rider travels the rails hunting and killing vulnerable women, has been doing it for years. When Mila’s friend, Ash, becomes the ghost rider’s next victim, she vows to travel the rail line to kill the rider and avenge her friend. A technological lark brings the attention of the FBI to this terror stalking the North, but Windermere and Stevens will have to hurry to catch Mila before she finds the rider – or he finds her. Another fantastic thriller from an author who writes with a fervor and passion that makes you want to stay up all night just to find out what happens next.

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Congrats to the Edgar Award Nominees!!!

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We were happy to see many of our favorite books and authors nominated for this years MWA Edgar Awards. Many of the books that made it into our Top  10 lists of the year, like Reed Farrel Coleman’s lyrical noir Where It Hurts and Alison Gaylin’s tale of celebricide What Remains Of Me, made the cut. Two of our favorite debuts of the year, Flynn Berry’s Under the Harrow (a tale of sisterly revenge) and Joe Ide’s IQ (an imaginative take on Sherlock Holmes, set in South Central LA), made the list for best first novel.

This may be the first year of mother-daughter nominees, with Patricia Abbott up for Best Paperback Original for Shot in Detroit and Megan Abbott up for Best Short Story for her contribution to Mississippi Noir. Some of out favorite anthologies, including Mississippi Noir, St. Louis Noir, and In Sunlight Or In Shadow: Stories Inspired By The Painting Of Edward Hopper had at least one story nominated for Best Short Story.

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Molly’s Top Ten International Crime Novels of 2016

  • Post by Director of Suspense Molly Odintz

2016 was a stellar year in international crime fiction – the stories below run the gamut from humorous to heart-breaking, daring to disturbing, and playful to pensive. There are entries on the list from Britain, Ireland, Brazil, Canada, France, Argentina, and more, yet the works are just some of the standouts in a thriving international crime fiction community. 

97800624407781. The Mother by Yvette Edwards

Yvette Edwards tells a moving tale from a complex perspective in this story of murder and consequences in London. Eight months after 16-year-old Ryan is stabbed to death by another teenager, his killer goes on trial, ready to protest his innocence. Ryan’s mother, and her sister Lorna, are torn between their search for justice and their empathy for the teenager on trial. The outcome of the trial comes down to the testimony of a vulnerable teenage mother previously involved with both Ryan and the defendant, and after amping up the action in the last third of the book, Edwards provides a hopeful conclusion. One of the most necessary and moving books of the year.

97815942064052. Perfect Days by Raphael Montes

This book is twisted! Frustrated by a lack of fulfillment in his imaginary relationship with a cadaver, a young medical student kidnaps a writer named Clarice and takes her on road trip through Brazil. From locking her in a suitcase to forcing her to accept his edits to her novel, the doctor-in-training makes Clarice’s life hell, all while justifying his actions to the reader in increasingly bizarre and sometimes comical ways. After several reversals of power, the ending will leave your mouth agape. As funny as it is disturbing!

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Scott’s Top Five Debuts of 2016

  • Post by Crime Fiction Coordinator Scott Montgomery

What surprised me this year was the variety of genres in which new talented authors popped up – from hard boiled, to historical, to rural. I usually want authors to take their time, but I really hope to see a follow up from everybody on this list by the end of 2017.

97803162641741. The Second Girl by David Swinson

A former D.C. cop turned private investigator and junkie inadvertently saves a girl while searching for a fix. Soon he is hired to find another girl who disappeared under similar circumstances. As the clock runs out, he battles the need for a fix, while trying find her. A streetwise and human PI novel. You can find copies on our shelves and via bookpeople.com. 

97801431287172. Speakers Of the Dead by J. Aaron Sanders

In 1840s New York, a young reporter, Walt Whitman, attempts to clear the name of a friend hung for a crime she didn’t commit. His search leads to a grave robbing ring, politics, religion, and Edgar Allen Poe. A ripping historical yarn yarn that fully uses time and place. You can find copies on our shelves and via bookpeople.com

97803991672633. Out Of The Blues by Trudy Nan Boyce

Newly minted Atlanta police detective Sarah Alt (aka Salt) catches a cold case involving the death of a bluesman. Her investigation involves a point in her city where race, politics, religion, and art meet in this involving procedure that any fan of Michael Connell’s harry Bosch should respect. You can find copies on our shelves and via bookpeople.com

4. Graveyard Of The Gods by Richard Newman9781943075201

A farmer makes ends meet by tossing his criminal war buddy’s murder victims to his hogs. When he recognizes one of the bodies he goes to a dirty little town for answers. Newman takes the structure and tightness of a paperback crime story and uses it as a elegy for a dying Midwest. You can find copies on our shelves and via bookpeople.com. 

97812500502295. The More They Disappear by Jesse Donaldson

A rural noir why-dunnit using a Kentucky town at the beginning of the Oxycontin crisis. As the interim sheriff looks into who killed his predecessor and the woman who did finds everything closing in on her, we see the the moral rot of small town America. You can find copies on our shelves and via bookpeople.com