MysteryPeople Review: DOING THE DEVIL’S WORK by Bill Loehfelm

doing the devil's work

Books are, even in today’s world, still the best narrative medium for contemplation. The reader has enough control to stop and extrapolate a bigger idea after a sentence, allowing the reader and book to have a dialogue. Prose gives both an intimacy and distance to take in everything intellectually and emotionally, allowing us to draw further conclusions.

I was reminded of this from a dialogue exchange in Bill Loehfelm’s Doing The Devil’s Work, the latest with cocktail-waitress-turned-New-Orleans-policewoman Maureen Coughlin. Halfway through, Maureen realizes she’s been pulled into a bribery exchange to protect the heir to an old money family. When she argues with her fellow officer, Quinn, for getting her into this, she refers to the poor, minority area she patrols –

“Ask the folks on Magnolia Street what good people Caleb Heath is.”

Quinn’s reply- “Fuck them. Why don’t I ask what they think about you, or anybody in uniform while I’m at it.”

That quick moment made me think about how the division between police and some of the the lower class communities they patrol can encourage corruption. By making those people the other, it becomes easier to collude with the upper class, being co-opted as enforcers for the rich and powerful.

Doing The Devil’s Work is obsessed by this idea and explores it with nuance. The story begins with what starts out as a routine traffic stop with a couple after she’s discovered a body. Loehfelm captures the mix of dread and humiliation when pulling over a belligerent person. When she arrests the man and holds the woman, she gets pulled into and compromised by a plot involving militia groups, a drug dealer she’s been wanting to bust, the obnoxious rich boy Caleb Heath, and her fellow officers.

It’s this look at city corruption that makes this book a standout. By making Coughlin a street cop, new to the streets as both citizen and cop, we get a ground level view of corruption and its impact. For Maureen to survive on the job where she has to rely on her fellow officers, she has to compromise herself in the go-along-to-get-along understanding of her department. It makes it close to impossible for her to draw the line. It’s her ability to to see herself in those she patrols that allows her draw her own lines.

Doing The Devil’s Work is like mixing The Wire with Treme together. It gives you a feel for one of this country’s most atmospheric cities while looking at its cycle of corruption that both fuels it and holds it back. What makes Maureen a heroine is her messed-up past that allows her to identify with those she serves and sometimes arrests. I’ll be rooting for her to keep that ability in books to come.


You can find copies of Doing The Devil’s Work on our shelves and via bookpeople.com. Bill Loehfelm joins us Monday, February 16, for Noir at the Bar at Opal Divine’s. Come join MysteryPeople for an evening of booze, books, and crime fiction with some of our favorite authors.

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