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MysteryPeople Q&A: Mark Pryor

buttonman
We’re always thrilled to have Mark Pryor back a new Hugo Marston book. This Saturday at 3PM, he’ll be signing and discussing The Button Man, taking us to London and Hugo’s past, looking at his early days with an early assignment as head of embassy security and how he met his ally, Meryln. Molly asked Mark some questions about the book beforehand.


Molly: You have chosen to represent a version of England experiencing the hangover of a more judgmental and restrictive era. Did you set out to show the link between conservative social politics and vigilantism? Do you feel that British conservative politics are on the upswing?

Mark Pryor: Let me start by saying, or emphasizing, that issues like politics, religion, and Beatles v. Rolling Stones should never be (in my humble opinion) front and center in crime fiction. The soapbox I possess is very small and is never produced when I’m writing. These issues reverberate in the back of my mind, as they do with us all, and so creep into themes and sub-plots. They are capillaries not aortas, country roads, not freeways.

That all said and understood, and in the context of The Button Man, I think that inevitably there is a strong link between vigilantism and a perceived better time, between the vigilante and a combined sense of impotence and nostalgia. A lot of my stories begin for the characters way before Chapter One, with a dose of personal history that surfaces and propels them into action. So it was here – a character feels powerfully that injustices would be lessened if the past could be resurrected. And since society as a whole won’t do it, the character will.

And you’re right, there is a parallel here between the story and the way I see things. To be fair, I’ve not been to England that much since I left but I do follow the news closely. And times have been hard for a lot of people, which makes them long for better days. They can’t see what’s coming up in the future so they look back. One area where this is true is immigration – if you think feelings are running high here, have a look across the pond. At least here there seems to be an acknowledgment a fix is needed, some sort of accommodation. But in Europe, not just in England, a lot of people are harking back to yesteryear, wanting to blame their travails on the open borders and wrap themselves in the comforts of the past.

Molly: You grew up in England, now living in Austin, and your character is a Texan living in England and then France. Why did you decide to write the character that way?

Mark: Originally, it was to honor my new home. I love Austin, I love Texas, and so I started there with Hugo. As must be obvious, I also love Europe and there’s no better start to a story than to drop someone where he doesn’t belong. Of course, Hugo adapts and loves being in Paris, and London, but a Texan strolling the boulevards of the City of Lights in his cowboy boots, well, I guess that was an image I couldn’t resist.

I had an interesting discussion with some people about Hugo recently. An older gentleman said that Hugo was the very image of an American. That took me (and a couple of other people) aback because I think people’s image of the average American may be a little less flattering. But he explained that he was thinking of Hugo’s Texas as the wild west, and Hugo himself as a cowboy figure. I didn’t have a cowboy in mind when I created him but it struck me that the gentleman was absolutely right – he’s the cowboy sipping his whiskey in the saloon, watching, staying out of trouble but able to handle himself when need be. I love that image of Hugo now, a modern cowboy.

Molly: The Button Man is a rather kinky novel at times. What made you want to explore the BDSM scene and its dynamics in a murder mystery?

Mark: Just so we don’t scare people off, I’ll point out that any kinky happenings take place off the page! But yes, I did want to use something a little different to spice things up, and I have several reasons. First, I wanted to challenge Hugo. I always tell people that he’s the most open-minded and live-and-let-live person, he doesn’t judge at all. He’s also very phlegmatic in his daily life. My fault, of course, I made him that way. But I wanted to press him a little, take something that’s totally foreign to him and see how he’d deal with it, what assumptions he’d make. I could have done it with a grisly murder or some other more criminal way, but this just struck me as more fun. And yes, after his initial surprise, he does manage to have some fun with it.

I also liked the idea of inserting something into the novel that ran strongly counter to the stuffy image a lot of people have of the English. It’s a broader point, I think, because it’s so true that you never really know what your friends and neighbors might be getting up to. And isn’t that sort of a fun idea? I personally love that about life, the knowledge that my neighbor might secretly be hoarding priceless stamps, that the English teacher across the street has fantasies about becoming a cat burglar, or that the old lady I walk across the road used to be a dominatrix.

Molly: Merlyn is such a fascinating character. What was the inspiration for her?

Mark: Thank you. As with most of my characters, she’s an amalgam of people I’ve known. And, I guess, people I’d like to know. I think I like Merlyn a lot because she really exemplifies two extremes – a great confidence and strength, but also a great delicacy of feeling. She’s also the only one to tell Hugo what’s really going on, she’s the one able to reach across from the kinky world he finds himself in, to explain it and try to make sense of it to him. The thing is, to do that she has to reveal secrets about herself, ones that most people would be embarrassed to share but she doesn’t feel any of that. She is the person that she is, exploring her inner desires with curiosity and honesty, not shame. Wouldn’t we all like to be a little more like that?

Molly: Your previous novels in the series have taken place in France, and The Button Man, as a prequel, takes place in England. What did you find most enjoyable about the change of scene? Do you have plans for Hugo Marston to travel elsewhere on the continent?

Mark: Like most people, I have great nostalgia for the place I grew up. I wanted to share that with my wife and kids, and then I wanted to share it with Hugo and my readers. So it made perfect sense to feature the village of Weston (where I grew up) and have something grisly happen in the churchyard there. People keep telling Hugo about the legend of Jack O’ Legs, too, from the village and I’ve always thought it a cool story, one worth sharing.

One of the traits Hugo and I share is a love of travel, seeing new places. And basing my books in Europe seems like too good of an opportunity to waste, for both of us. So yes, in the next book Hugo (and Tom) will have to go to Barcelona. The daughter of a young friend is missing and they trace her to Spain… I think after that I’ll return to Paris for book six. Maybe Bordeaux will feature, I don’t know yet. But definitely back to France. After that? Well, he and I will have to wait and see.


Mark Pryor will speak and sign The Button Man this Saturday, September 13, at 3pm. Copies of The Button Man are available on our shelves and bookpeople.com

MysteryPeople Review: NINE DAYS, by Minerva Koenig

nine daysMinerva Koenig has just published her debut novel, Nine Days, and will be speaking and signing her book on Friday, September 12, at 7pm, on BookPeople’s second floor. Minerva Koenig, when not writing mysteries, works as a licensed architect in Austin, and spends her days engaging in numerous activities, including wrangling cats and fighting the patriarchy.


 

Nine Days announces a great new voice in Minerva Koenig. The story sweeps in like a southwest breeze, dry in wit and hot in attitude. It is a book that embraces its characters, warts and all. It even goes so far as to practically celebrate their warts.

The lead heroine, Julia Kalas, is particularly unique. Short, round, and pushing forty, Julia used her California building renovation business as a cover for her husband’s gunrunning trade for decades. After the Aryan Brotherhood assassinates her husband, she finds herself in Witness Protection in a small Texas town, in a nice twist on the typical California-to-Texas move, stuck with a tough female marshal she refers to as “The Amazon” looking over her shoulder.

Julia finds work at a local bar owned by Hector, a man with his own dark past, and sparks between them soon fly. When a body turns up on top of the bar, Hector becomes the main suspect. To clear his name, Julia gets involved, using her own criminal contacts. She crisscrosses the state and the Southwest, getting in deeper and deeper, eluding The Amazon and a few bullets along the way.

It is Koenig’s love and respect for her characters that make this book pop. Many are unconventional and few are pretty. They and Koenig don’t ask you to like them and that’s why you love them. Julia herself makes no apologies for who she is and proves she can get a man as easy, sometimes easier, than some teen centerfold. Koenig understands that the way to her characters’ humanity is through their unconventionality.

Nine Days introduces us to a fresh hard-boiled voice. Koenig embraces the genre, yet doesn’t completely play by its rules. I can’t wait to see what other conventions she’ll break.


Minerva Koenig will be speaking and signing her latest novel, Nine Days, Friday, September 12, at 7 pm on BookPeople’s second floor. You can find copies of his new book on our shelves and via bookpeople.com.

MysteryPeople Review: THE BUTTON MAN, by Mark Pryor

buttonman

 

--Post by Molly

Mark Pryor grew up in England, moved to Texas, and now works as an assistant district attorney in Austin. He is also the author of the Hugo Marston series, and has just released a fourth book in the series. Mark Pryor will join us this Saturday, September 13, at 3pm, to speak and sign his latest release, The Button Man.


Mark Pryor has just released The Button Man, a prequel to his Hugo Marston series. What’s the twist? This one is set in London, not Paris, and Marston has just begun his new career as head of US Embassy security. At the sleepy embassy, he spends much of his time researching Jack the Ripper and trying to link the serial killer with other, American serial killers, in particular the Servant Girl Annihilator of late 19th century Austin.

One night, while on the historical prowl for evidence in a graveyard, Hugo comes across a more recent corpse – a dead woman, hung by the neck, face covered in a white shroud. The corpse turns out to be an American starlet. The starlet’s husband, also an actor, is in jail for killing a farmer while driving drunk. If there was not enough scandal already, the actor, upon release, won’t stay put in the American embassy and Marston must cooperate with British police to find the rogue American before he, too, pops up dead in a graveyard. Marston’s search leads him to a mysterious manor in the countryside used for secretive and rather salacious purposes, and he must get aid from a mysterious young woman with a strange name and a double life.

As Marston continues to search for the American actor, he gains many an opportunity to ruminate over the current state of affairs in society, including such topics as England’s lack of a death penalty, the possibility of redemption for criminals that have served their time, and the extreme susceptibility to exposure and blackmail of those members of society who lead taboo lives. In general, however, Marston pursues his target with vigor, leading to quite a few thrilling chase sequences as Marston grows closer to the truth. Pryor carefully structures the narrative to include just as much conversation as action, and every scene obeys the old writing adage to either move the plot forward or aid in character development.

The stunning English scenery, like the Parisian backdrops of Marston’s previous adventures, shines throughout the book, and Pryor has a particular gift in bringing the spookiness of the old country to an American audience. Pryor makes good use of cemeteries, manor houses, tiny English villages, and even Madame Tussaud’s Wax Museum to impeccably meld place and setting. His portrayal of England – sunk under the weight of history – almost makes me glad to be an American, although many of the historical issues with which British characters in the story grapple are still very much part of the American present. Fans of the series will find that despite the difference in setting, Pryor’s latest fits in perfectly with the rest of the Hugo Marston novels, and I look forward to many more Marston stories to come.


You can find all the Hugo Marston books – The Bookseller, The Crypt Thief, The Blood Promise, and The Button Man, on our shelves now and via bookpeople.com. Mark Pryor will read from and sign his new novel Saturday, September 13, at 3 pm, on BookPeople’s second floor. All BookPeople events are free and open to the public.

 

Crime Fiction Friday: BAD MAN’S MONEY by Mike McCrary

crime scene
We’ve already become fans of Mike McCrary with his novel, Remo Went Rogue. Check out the full review of Remo Went Rogue on this blog for more. Beyond the humor and fast-pacing, you’ll quickly learn that whether in the novel or this story from Out of the Gutter, McCrary is able to grab your attention immediately and have you follow a character, even if you don’t necessarily like them, to the very end. A nasty, gritty, though perhaps deserved, end. With McCrary, we are in good hands. Now, enjoy the ride.

“Bad Man’s Money” by Mike McCrary

 

“Let’s be clear. I am not a bad man.

A desperate man? Sure. A drunk with his fair share of struggles? Absolutely, but not a bad man.

A bad man is cruel. He profits from the weak, takes more than he gives and cares nothing about other people.

I have stolen from such a man…”

 

Click here to read the full story.

MysteryPeople Review: REMO WENT ROGUE by Mike McCrary

remowentrogue

Reviewed by Scott

Some of the most entertaining crime fiction is simply about nasty people trying to get one over on each other. There is a visceral charge to get out of people unrestrained by morality. Mike McCrary understands this completely in his new novel, Remo Went Rogue.

The first chapter is a story of violence, told during sex. The violence involves a bank robbery committed by the Mashburn Brothers, who leave no witnesses. The sex is between Remo Cobb, their defense attorney, and the assistant district attorney. Remo has got the Mashburns to tell him where the money is and now he’s throwing the case, with the plan they’ll get either life or death.

But they don’t. When they get out they go looking for Remo with a Jesus loving psychopath and a lot of guns. Remo finds refuge with a contract killer he’s defended.

McCrary knows exactly what kind of book he’s writing and he delivers. He gives us a tight read, under 200 pages, that never stops moving. The action is clear, punchy, and visceral. All of of the conniving and brutality is viewed with a jaundiced eye that barely blinks. Any time the story seems to veer towards sentimentality, Remo’s slimy viewpoint swings it back on to the rough road.

Remo Went Rogue is a fun, fast ride. It is a mean, hard boiled novel with a fresh spin on the genre and filled with rich black humor. Now if someone will make the movie.


You can find Remo Went Rogue on our shelves and via bookpeople.com.

MysteryPeople Review: THE DROP by Dennis Lehane

Dennis Lehane‘s The Drop had an interesting journey to becoming a published novel. It was originally a manuscript he shelved years ago, then later used a piece of for his acclaimed short story “Animal Control” that first appeared in Boston Noir. He later adapted the story into a film featuring Tom Hardy and James Gandolfini that will be released on September 12th. When asked if he’d be interested to do a tie-in novel, he took elements from the the manuscript that started it all. The result is a tight, emotional ride that will please old fans  and find new ones.

The main character is Bob Saginoswki, a man life and circumstances have left behind. He works as a bartender for Cousin Marve, a one-time small-time gangster, whose bar is now owned by the Chechen mob as a temporary hiding place for their ill gotten gains, A drop bar. Living alone, with only visits to a local church, he has little outside Marve and the bar.

Two events upend this solitary, quiet existence. One is the discovery of an abused and abandoned pup in the trash outside the apartment of Nadia, a woman who has seen her share of damage. The two develop a tentative relationship after she helps him with the dog after he adopts it. Then Cousin Marve is robbed. The Chechens want their money from Bob and Marve or else. Both story lines entwine when the psychotic owner of the dog comes back to claim the animal.

This is a compact book with a lot packed in it. Everything locks into place perfectly. The story is well-paced as it builds to a wonderful, hard-boiled climax. Lehane introduces  information, then holds back, revealing it’s importance at just the right time. With Bob, he gives us a lead we feel deeply for, hinting at something dark underneath. He’s Paddy Cayefsky’s Marty with a slow burn fuse. You don’t only root for him to get out alive, but still have his heart intact.

The Drop is everything a Dennis Lehane lover wants, especially fans of Mystic River and his Kenzie-Gennaro series. He mainlines human emotion from tough people in a hard world with little compromise and still give a slam-bang read. Now we wait for the Broadway musical version.

MysteryPeople Review: THE GOOD LIFE, by Frank Wheeler, Jr.

the good lifeReview By Molly

Frank Wheeler Jr. has just published his second novel, The Good Life, and boy, is it a doozy. Wheeler’s first book, The Wowzer, was well received as a debut novel upon its release in 2012. In The Good Life, Earl Haack Jr., raised by his policeman father to take a rather flexible approach to civil liberties, corruption, and brutality, works to take control of the drug trade in his hometown and carry on the family legacy. Haack is joined by his idiot brother and formidable ex-wife in his efforts to extend control over a huge and warring territory in what feels like equal parts Bad Lieutenant, The Godfather, and The Killer Inside Me.

The Good Life goes well alongside MysteryPeople’s September Pick of the Month, Benjamin Whitmer‘s new book Cry, Father - both star characters that go by Junior and have been virtually destroyed by the legacy of their fathers. While Whitmer’s tale focuses on the ways in which a father can try hard and still mess up, Wheeler’s novel takes a much more Machiavellian approach, showing the damage that can be done by a powerful and dangerous figure who deliberately sets out for his children to follow in his (bloody) footsteps.

Each part of Wheeler’s latest is both terrifying and tongue-in-cheek, starting with the title. “The Good Life” is the state motto of Nebraska, from whence the author hails and where the novel takes place. Another meaning for the title comes from Haack’s belief that he is creating a better world.  By taking out the most violent drug traffickers and moderating the level of violence in the community through his own control of the drug trade, Earl Haack, Jr., thinks he can establish “the good life” for his hometown. Earl also understands that through his corrupt actions, he also gains for himself and his ex-wife “the good life” of a gangster, in stark contrast to any morally driven part of his character. The novel, like the title, draws attention to Earl’s hypocrisy throughout, and although the novel consists mainly of snappy dialogue and extreme violence, Wheeler takes just the right amount of time to meditate on the nature of morality.

Wheeler’s new novel is not only impeccably plotted but also perfectly choreographed, with stylish dialogue and hard, tight writing. Wheeler grounds the narrative well in his native Nebraska, but abstracts the struggles of his characters to represent much of the struggle of modern America as a whole. The Good Life reads like rural noir, but feels like a gangster flick. The entire novel is cinematic in its scope, and if Quentin Tarantino teamed up with Francis Ford Coppola to make a movie about small-town corrupt cops in Nebraska starring Mathew McConaughey and Salma Hayek, it might look something like this book.  Hint, hint, Hollywood.


Copies of The Good Life are available via bookpeople.com and are coming soon to our shelves.

Mystery People Review: BRAINQUAKE, by Samuel Fuller

brainquake

Review by Scott

Writer-director Samuel Fuller was a filmmaker from the fifties and sixties whose work still seems fresh, modern, and bold. His grab-you-by-the-throat intensity of style influenced the likes of Goddard, Scorsese, and Tarantino. What some may not know is that he wrote novels from the 1930s up until the the time of his death in 1997. Hard Case Crime gives us a look into this side of his talent by bringing us Brainquake, a Fuller novel that has just been published in the US and in English for the first time.

Fuller’s belief, “If the first scene doesn’t give you a hard-on then throw the goddamn thing away,” is applied to the first line of the novel: “Sixty seconds before the baby shot its father, leaves fell lazily in Central Park.” The murdered father is a mobster. Before the baby and mother are killed, Paul Pope, underworld bagman, saves them. Paul suffers from mental seizures which he refers to as “brainquakes,” where his mind spins into pink tinted images accompanied by piercing flute music. It is easy to picture Fuller’s avant garde camera cut loose during these passages. Paul falls for the mob widow, who he refers to as “ivory face”, setting up a series of events that ripple through the New York crime syndicate that employs him. The mob puts Father Flannigan, a contract killer who dresses like a priest and crucifies his targets, on to Paul as Flannigan’s next target.

Brainquake has the feel of a Sam Fuller film. The detailed life of a bagman is reminiscent of the attention brought to the lifestyle of the pickpocket Richard Widmark played in Pick Up On South Street. It portrays New York City with gritty realism mixed with pulp stylization. The dialogue blasts out  like gunshots and his tabloid inspired prose has the punchy feel of his editing. The emotions are raw and heightened. Everything is heightened, yet retains the truth in its main characters.

Brainquake is full on Fuller. Those who have seen his interviews can hear his boisterous cigar stained voice in the writing. It is uncompromising, wild, tough, and goes right at you, giving a fresh perspective on a great, often under appreciated artist, while delivering a slam-bang read.


Copies of Brainquake are available on our shelves and via bookpeople.com.

Guest Post: Kira Piekoff On Her Latest, NO TIME TO DIE

no time to die

Guest Post by Kira Peikoff

In my new book No Time to Die, Zoe Kincaid, a 20-year-old college dropout, has long endured a mystifying ailment that has stunted her development. The truth will shock her: she’s biologically stopped aging, and her DNA may hold the key to unlocking a secret sought since the dawn of time: why do we age and die? But with some powerful people willing to kill, soon Zoe finds herself at the center of a dangerous manhunt with epic consequences.

I created the character of Zoe after learning about the real-life case of Brooke Greenberg, an adolescent girl who had inexplicably stopped aging as a toddler. Today, six other similar girls have been identified, and they are all participating in a cutting-edge research study that aims to examine their DNA for shared mutations. The hope is that scientists will discover a gene (or group of genes) at the root of the aging process, which could then be turned on or off. Imagine being able to stop aging whenever you wanted; would you do it? I think I know your answer, but think again. What would it really be like to be forever young? Read No Time to Die to find out…

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Copies of No Time to Die are available on our shelves and via bookpeople.com.

MysteryPeople Q&A with Martin Limón

Today is the release of our Pick Of The Month, The Iron Sickle by Martin Limón. The book deals with Sueño and Bascome, his Army CID cops stationed in Seventies-era South Korea, going after a killer who uses the title weapon on Army personnel. Martin Limón was kind enough to answer a few questions about the book and his writing.


MysteryPeople: How did the idea for the sickle killer come about?

Martin Limón: In addition to my years spent in Korea, I still read a lot about Korea and the Korean War.  Most recently, I’ve been reading post-war Korean literature translated into English by friends of minE, Bruce and Ju-chan Fulton, much of it centered around the lingering trauma of the war.  Also, I was influenced, and appalled, by reports of the massacre of Korean refugees at the village of Nohgun-ri.  In addition, I remembered the naht, the short-handled Korean sickle used by farmers to harvest rice and by gardening crews on the American Army compounds to cut grass.  It all came together in this story.  Still, I needed a person to wield the iron sickle.  A person mad enough to use it and an event, or series of events, that drove him to this extreme level of madness.  Gradually, the story and the characters came together.

MP: It was great to see Mr. Kill back.  What made you want to use him again?

ML: Partially, he is a device to get George Sueño and Ernie Bascom off compound.  They are always in trouble with their superiors and thus always relegated to the “black market detail.”  That is, busting Korean civilian dependents for re-selling American-made products out of the Army commissary and PX.  But when Mr. Kill, the highest ranking homicide investigator in the Korean National Police, asks for their assistance, they are freed up from their more mundane duties.  Nothing irritates a military officer more than having one of his subordinates temporarily detailed outside of his or her direct control.  But when the directive comes down from the 8th Army Chief of Staff, their boss has no choice but to comply.

Also, Mr. Kill is highly educated, not only in the States at an Ivy League university but also in the ancient arts of calligraphy and Classical Chinese literature.  It’s fun to bring these elements not only into the resolution of the mystery but also as a counterpoint to modern Korean society and the anti-intellectual American military world in which George and Ernie live.

Finally, and most importantly, people tell me they like reading about him.  I like writing about him.

MP:  Much of the book’s last half takes place out in the mountain area of Korea.  Do you have to keep some things in mind when Sueño and Bascom are out in the wilderness?

ML: Well, they are both city boys.  Ernie grew up in the suburbs of Detroit and George was an orphan who lived in foster homes throughout Los Angeles County.  George had never seen snow—other than in photos and movies—until he went on his first field maneuver in the army.  In the book, they are surprised that the amenities they’re used to—public baths, mokkolli houses, noodle shops—aren’t available in the Taebaek Mountains but the training they received from the army helps pull them through.

MP: The friendship between Sueño and Bascom is both unique and real. What do they provide each other?

ML: They provide complete loyalty.  Both of them are unabashed “lifers,” career soldiers.  Yet they are in constant rebellion against the restrictions of military life and, more often than not, the go-along-to-get-along attitude of most of their superiors and fellow soldiers.  Since they share these qualities, they look out for one another.  Also, Ernie is focused strictly on the moment.  He does what he wants to do, when he wants to do it.  He never looks back or even ponders anything he’s done, much less regret it.  George, on the other hand, is constantly evaluating every decision he makes and is riddled with regrets about the past and anxieties about the future.  Both of them admire the opposite qualities they see in one another, although they don’t fully understand them.

MP: You were pretty much self-taught as a writer.  Did you draw from any influential writers?

ML: There are four writers who made me realize that the type of stories I had to tell might find an audience.  First, was Herman Melville.  I once got in trouble (I know, it’s hard to believe) and was restricted to compound for one week.  I was so angry at myself that I decided to add to the punishment by spending the week reading a classic (like the ones I wouldn’t read when I was in high school).  At the base library I found Moby Dick.  To my surprise, within the first few pages, I discovered that the young man, Ishmael, who was venturing off to see “the watery parts of the world” was much like me.  He craved adventure and, aboard ship, he hated officers.  I flew through the book, enjoying every word of it.  The next was Jack London, a fellow native Californian.  Read “To Build a Fire.”  That is, in my opinion, the greatest single piece of prose writing in the English language.  Third was Richard McKenna.  After serving 30 years in the Navy, he retired as a Chief in the late 1950s and proceeded to write The Sand Pebbles which won the National Book Award.  It was about common sailors and their day-to-day problems.  Not the heroics that most military stories try to shove down our throats.  Finally, was Darryl Ponicsan.  He wrote The Last Detail.  That book showed me that one could write a story about the real lives of enlisted men in the military, with all its beauty and all its squalor.

When I first set out to start writing, I had these four writers in mind and I was still on active duty in the military.  My goal was to tell the story of the day-to-day life of American soldiers in Korea, and the day-to-day lives of the Korean people who dealt with them.  It was a world that most Americans didn’t even know existed.  In order to show that world, from the cultured environs of cocktail parties hosted by the American Ambassador to the lowest rat-infested back alleys, I figured the mystery genre was the way to go.  I focused my reading on the genre:  Chandler, Hammett, James M. Cain, Robert B Parker, Ross MacDonald and many others.  Fortunately, I stumbled on my all-time favorite:  the Matt Scudder series written by Lawrence Block.  For my money, they’re still the best mystery stories in print; especially the first half dozen or so books in the series.

MP: As with several of the books, The Iron Sickle deals with repressed history.  What is the danger of not knowing all of our past?

ML: The Korean War is often called the forgotten war and for good reason. People forget that Korea had a huge impact on the American strategy in Vietnam.  In Korea, we were able to fight the Communists to a standstill and left the country divided into north and south.  In Vietnam, the goal was the same.  To keep a supposedly democratic South Vietnam and leave North Vietnam under the Communists.  Many people correctly pointed out that to win the war we should invade North Vietnam (either that or withdraw completely).  But the lesson of the Korean War had shown that if we threatened to overrun the north, the Communist Chinese would intervene; as they had in Korea with an estimated two to three million “volunteer” soldiers.  Nobody wanted that, so years of stalemate ensued.

We also forget how much damage was done to Korea.  Our bombing campaign left only “rubble bouncing on rubble.”  Those the words of an American pilot.  Even Winston Churchill criticized the U.S. for “splashing” napalm all over North Korea. Two to three million people died in a country of a little over twenty-five million.  The trauma was inestimable.  And it lingered for years, even to this day, which is what The Iron Sickle is all about.


You can ask Matin Limón your own questions when he calls into our Hard Word Book club discussion of his first Sueño-Bascom novel, Jade Lady Burning, on September 24th, at 7PM.

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